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Inupiat Heritage Center
P 0. Box 749
Barrow, Alaska 99723
Voice: 907-852-5494

The “Climate Change: Science and Traditional Knowledge” Kiosk was developed by the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) in cooperation with the Inupiat Heritage Center and community members that are knowledgeable in the weather. It is both in the English and Inupiat language. It’s primary use is to educate both the school students and the community about how the change in our weather effects the land and the ocean.

INUA - The Spirit World of the Bering Sea. This is an exhibit on loan from the Smithsonian Institute, displaying ethnographic collections from western and northern Alaska and their main groups of Inuit, the Inupiat and the Yup'ik.

The showcases in the hallways feature Inuit art from Alaska, Greenland, Siberia and Canada. Artifacts are made out of ivory, whale bone, caribou antlers, miniature sleds made from caribou jaws, membrane used as raincoats, baleen whale boats and baskets (the membrane of baleen can be transformed into translucent material), masks made from caribou fawn skins; and dolls produced by many community members.

Waterproof sealskin boots are still used for hunting today. The original model is 2,500 years old. Harbor seal is used for the soft part and ugruk seal for the hard sole.

Two kayaks are hung above the reception area. Fred Koenig built the older Kayak in 1912 in Point Hope. This long, pointy and narrow kayak was used on the ocean to hunt seals. The one beside it was built in 1920 by Charles Dewitt Brower, and was used to cross rivers and to travel; it is wider and shorter and not as tipsy as the ocean kayak.



Pictures and information were provided by the Inupiat Heritage Center

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