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Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins Historic State Park

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Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins Historic State Park
3400 North Museum Point
Crystal River, Florida 34428
Voice: 352-795-3817

In a small wooded area near Homosassa is one of Florida's most evocative historic settings, the ruins of the Yulee Sugar Mill. More than 100 years ago this was a thriving sugar plantation. It was built by David Levy Yulee who is considered one of Florida's most outstanding historic figures. David was born in 1810 on the island of St. Thomas but came to Florida as a young child. In 1838 he became a member of Florida's first constitutional convention and in 1841 was elected as a territorial delegate to the Congress.  He became Florida's first U.S. Senator when the state was founded in 1845.

After marrying, he moved to his plantation near the Homosassa River. By 1851, his sugar mill had 1,000 workers. Expensive machinery was imported from New York. He was also involved in building some of Florida's first railroads. For the next ten years it was a time of prosperity. Then came the civil war.

In 1861, Yulee chose to serve in the newly created Congress of the Confederacy. However he chose not to allow the Confederacy use of his railroad. The mill supplied sugar to the Southern troops and his mansion was used to store ammunition and supplies. The Union Naval Force burned his home to the ground in 1864. The mill was located inland and escaped damage. Even so, the mill never resumed operations after the end of the war and fell to ruin.

In 1953 the site was deeded to the state. Today some of the mill has been partially restored. You can tour the ruins at your own pace with the help of a concrete path and interpretive plaques.



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