Traveling Across
Georgia

Garrard's Cavalry Raid

Home >> Georgia Home Page >> Georgia Historical People and Events

Did You Know
Jokes
Puzzles
Recipes
Tributes

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
DC
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Garrard’s Cavalry Raid
Lawrenceville, Georgia 30043
Voice: 770-232-3000

On July 20, 1864, Union forces under Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman, were closing in on Atlanta. Hq. 2nd Cavalry Division. Brig. Gen. Kenner Garrard was in Decatur, 6 miles east of Atlanta. Garrard's three brigades were guarding bridges over the Chattahoochee River and picketing the left flank. That night, Garrard was ordered to assemble his command and march to Covington (29 miles south) to burn the bridges over the Yellow and Ulcofauhachee (Alcovy) rivers and destroy the Georgia Railroad in that area.

He marched late on the 21st. Next morning the destruction was begun. At Covington, he burned the depot, a newly-built hospital center, 2,000 bales of cotton, and large quantities of quartermaster and commissary supplies. After destroying 2 railroad and 4 wagon bridges, 3 trains and 6 miles of track, he turned north toward Loganville (11 miles southeast), arriving there on July 23rd.

While Long's and Miller's brigades performed the same mission in and around Loganville, Garrard detached Minty's brigade to Lawrenceville to strip this area of horses and mules. Reaching Lawrenceville later in the day, Minty encountered a small force of cavalry which, after a sharp skirmish, he drove from the town. After rounding up all stock which had not been hidden at his approach, Minty moved to Yellow River (4 miles southwest) and made camp. Next morning he marched to Decatur to rejoin Garrard.



Pictures and information were provided by The Lawrenceville Tourism & Trade Association

Georgia Home Page | Georgia Aquarium | Georgia Beaches | Georgia Cemeteries | Georgia Cities | Georgia City Parks | Georgia Forts and Battlefields | Georgia Gardens | Georgia Historical Buildings
Georgia Historical People and Events | Georgia Lakes Rivers and Streams | Georgia Lighthouses | Georgia Museums | Georgia Scenic Places | Georgia State and National Parks | Georgia Theme Parks | Georgia Zoos

About Us | Contact Us | Did You Know Facts | Jokes | Puzzles | Recipes | Suggest a Site | Tributes

Copyright A View of America 1998 all rights reserved any and all content on this site is protected by law. Any use with out written permission is strictly prohibited.