Traveling Across
Georgia

Georgia Historical People and Events

Home >> Georgia Home Page

Did You Know
Jokes
Puzzles
Recipes
Tributes

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
DC
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Georgia has played a major role throughout America's history. February 12, 2013 marks 280 years since General James Oglethorpe and his shipload of settlers reached their new home and founded the colony of Georgia. The last of the 13 British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard, Georgia was founded on February 12, 1733 at the present site of the city of Savannah.

With the arrival of more colonists, settlements developed along the coast and up the rivers. In 1758 the province of Georgia was divided into eight parishes, with four new parishes added in 1765. Georgia suffered both a loss of population and considerable physical destruction because of the Revolutionary War. The desire for land, and later gold, created a swift expansion beyond the old frontier, carrying with it increased trade along rivers and migration of people along new roads into the wilderness. The primary basis for this new growth and economic expansion was the production of cotton through a slave labor system.

Georgia formally joined the Confederate States of America. Georgia did not suffer direct devastation from the Civil War until 1864 when General William Tecumseh Sherman advanced though Northern Georgia, besieged and captured Atlanta, and then pushed on to Savannah on his famous March to the Sea. During the war years, Georgia lost nearly 120,000 men and boys in battle as well as much of the state's material wealth. The rebuilding of the state afterwards was a slow and painful process.

Although the state suffered along with the rest of the nation during the Great Depression, Georgia was able to achieve slow economic progress during the early years of the 20th century. Following World War II, the pace of industrial growth became more apparent.

As a result of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's under the leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., black voters, who after the reconstruction era were excluded from effective participation in state politics, assumed an active role in the political life of the state. Then in January, 1977, Georgia sent its first President to the White House, Jimmy Carter of Plains, a former Georgia governor.

 
Garrard’s Cavalry Raid
Lawrenceville, Georgia 30043
Voice: 770-232-3000
More Info
President Jimmy Carter
300 North Bond Street
Plains, Georgia 31780
Voice: 229-824-4104
More Info
 


Georgia Home Page | Georgia Aquarium | Georgia Beaches | Georgia Cemeteries | Georgia Cities | Georgia City Parks | Georgia Forts and Battlefields | Georgia Gardens | Georgia Historical Buildings
Georgia Historical People and Events | Georgia Lakes Rivers and Streams | Georgia Lighthouses | Georgia Museums | Georgia Scenic Places | Georgia State and National Parks | Georgia Theme Parks | Georgia Zoos

About Us | Contact Us | Did You Know Facts | Jokes | Puzzles | Recipes | Suggest a Site | Tributes

Copyright A View of America 1998 all rights reserved any and all content on this site is protected by law. Any use with out written permission is strictly prohibited.