Traveling Across
Massachusetts

President John Adams

Home >> Massachusetts Home Page >> Massachusetts Historical People and Events

Did You Know
Jokes
Puzzles
Recipes
Tributes

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
DC
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

President John Adams
1250 Hancock Street
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169
Voice: 617-770-1175

Our second president was born on October 30, 1735 in Braintree, Massachusetts. He grew up on his fatherís farm. At age sixteen, he went to Harvard University, and eventually he became a lawyer. As a lawyer, his moat famous case was defending British Soldiers that were arrested after the Boston Massacre in 1770, which turned out to be a success.

After Graduating, Adams wrote newspaper articles about the Stamp Tax, which established his reputation as a political thinker. This improved his popularity amongst the public. During the Revolutionary War, John Adams served as a delegate from Massachusetts.

After America gained freedom, John Adams was elected Vice President under George Washington. After serving, he was elected President of the Untied States. In the beginning of his presidency, tension was growing between the British and the French. Adams rushed to France to establish a peace treaty, this caused an unhappy uproar in America. Adams did successfully create a treaty between France and America, but in return he found that his whole political party had turned against him.

In the following presidential election, Adams lost to Tomas Jefferson. He then retired to his farm in Quincy, Massachusetts. Adams and Jefferson remained friends even after several political debates. They wrote letters to each other until the end of Adamís life on July 4th, 1826, when he died of reasons unknown.



Massachusetts Home Page | Massachusetts Historical People and Events | Massachusetts Museums

About Us | Contact Us | Did You Know Facts | Jokes | Puzzles | Recipes | Suggest a Site | Tributes

Copyright A View of America 1998 all rights reserved any and all content on this site is protected by law. Any use with out written permission is strictly prohibited.