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Concorde

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Concorde
Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum
Pier 86, West 46th Street and & 12th Avenue
New York, New York 10036
Voice: 212-245-0072

The fastest Atlantic crossing by any Concorde took only 2 hours, 52 minutes, and 59 seconds. This record-breaking plane, Concorde AD, is the very same one housed at the Intrepid Museum.

Her cruising altitude is 60,000 feet, her top speed is Mach 2.04, and due to friction heating, the Concorde expands approximately 8 inches during flight.

Even today, 32 years after the start of Concorde's commercial service, she remains the fastest and the highest-flying airliner in existence. The development of the Concorde began in the early 1960's and officially concluded with her entry into service in 1976. The Concorde is one of the finest examples of aviation engineering capable of flying at extremes of altitude and speed.

The specific aircraft located at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum is registered under designation G-BOAD and is commonly referred to as “Alpha Delta.” The aircraft itself has a very interesting history. It flew for the first time on August 25, 1976 from Filton, England, and was delivered to British Airways (BA) on December 6, 1976.

On February 7, 1996, “Alpha Delta” made the fastest Atlantic crossing of a Concorde, taking just 2 hours, 52 minutes, and 59 seconds. During her career, G-BOAD flew 23,397 hours, made 8,406 landings and underwent 7,010 supersonic cycles. The final flight of the “Alpha Delta” took place on November 10, 2003, and the aircraft was de-registered on May 4, 2004. Today “Alpha Delta” is on permanent display at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum.



Pictures and information were provided by Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum

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