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National Museum of Horse Shoeing Tools

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National Museum of Horse Shoeing Tools
8849 Highway 177 North
Sulphur, Oklahoma 73086-9656
Voice: 580-622-4644
Fax: 580-622-4669

Whether you're a farrier, a horseman, or just interested in learning something about one of the horse world's oldest trades, a visit to the National Museum of Horse Shoeing Tools gives an entertaining look at the tools, life and products in the horse shoers' world. Begun as a private collection, the Museum features one-of-a-kind items and memorabilia that has been gathered over many years. Now, in one place is an unprecedented and never-before-seen collection that contains both the conventional and the unusual - the contemporary and the obsolete. Plus, the museum features an extensive collection of the horse shoer in art. Visit the National Museum of Horse Shoeing tools and be delighted and amazed as you view the heritage and the history of the trade itself. Tour the museum's Hall of Honor to learn about the luminaries in this fascinating field - the companies and manufacturers that have created products for the horse shoeing industry. It is a walk back into history and a return to the present.

Horses and mules contributed a vital part to the development of America, especially in settling the West. The animals played such an important role in the American Civil War that high-ranking Union officers demanded that troops seek and destroy Southern blacksmith shops on which armies at that time depended. Soldiers in blue carried out their mission of destruction. They promoted an end to the conflict when they found and destroyed the tools that kept Confederate troops supplied with the absolute necessity of food and supplies. Complying with the order, invading Union soldiers pounded on the horn until they separated it from the anvil, thereby denying further use. And then they grabbed the much-wanted nails.

As important as the blacksmith was in keeping the harness horses and pack mules safely shod, "his craftsmanship was just as vital in keeping the wheels of wagons rolling safely." As pioneers moved westward, one of the first businesses to appear was a hardware store with blacksmith supplies, and next a blacksmith shop. A hotel and restaurant followed, along with a Western saloon and place of entertainment, outbuildings, a livery stable, a courthouse and a jail. Other business establishments were added as the need and demand arose. The visitor finds this idea suggested in a subtle manner in the background in a spacious section of the museum.



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