Traveling Across
Pennsylvania

Schriver House

Home >> Pennsylvania Home Page >> Pennsylvania Historical Buildings

Did You Know
Jokes
Puzzles
Recipes
Tributes

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
DC
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Schriver House
309 Baltimore Street
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325
Voice: 717-337-2800

The Schriver House is a Civil War museum that is dedicated to the civilian experience at Gettysburg. The home of George and Hettie Schriver has been painstakingly restored and furnished to its original 1860's appearance and is used as a backdrop to tell the Schriver family story. The museum focuses on understanding the aftermath of the battle and its effects on the citizens of this small town.

In 1860, the house was built with "Schriver's Saloon" in the lower level and a "ten pin alley" was behind the house. The saloon and alley were never opened due to the war. In September 1861, George left to join the Union army. He came home for four days at Christmas time in 1863. Then on January 1, 1864, he was captured and died in Anderson prison.

During the Battle of Gettysburg, Hettie and their two girls, Hettie and Molly ages 5 and 7, left and went to her parents farm. When they returned, they found that the house had been used by Confederate Sharpshooters. According to accounts of their neighbor (he had stayed in his home) of the events, there were two of the sharpshooters killed in the attic. During the restoration of the house, bullets and medical supplies were found under the floorboards.

During your tour of the house, you will hear the story of the Schriver family, before, after, and during the war. You will receive a very good glimpse into everyday life and customs of the 1860's. After touring the battlefields and learning about the soldiers hardships, this is a "must-see" to learn about the townspeople and the hardships the battle caused here.

KAT'S VIEW

Here there was a little bowling set in the children's room, not a real one but a toy. They were made out of wood. There was a box used to store food in which was called, even in the 19th century, a refrigerator. The most interesting thing that I liked was called a spider. It was used to pit cherries, but it looks like a cherry shooter instead!



Pennsylvania Home Page | Pennsylvania Bed and Breakfast Inns | Pennsylvania Cemeteries | Pennsylvania Cities | Pennsylvania Factory Tours | Pennsylvania Forts and Battlefields
Pennsylvania Historical Buildings | Pennsylvania Historical People and Events | Pennsylvania Hotels and Motels | Pennsylvania Lakes Rivers and Streams | Pennsylvania Museums
Pennsylvania Restaurants | Pennsylvania RV Resorts | Pennsylvania Scenic Places | Pennsylvania Shopping | Pennsylvania Wineries | Pennsylvania Zoos

About Us | Contact Us | Did You Know Facts | Jokes | Puzzles | Recipes | Suggest a Site | Tributes

Copyright A View of America 1998 all rights reserved any and all content on this site is protected by law. Any use without written permission is strictly prohibited.