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Hampton Preston Mansion

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The Hampton-Preston Mansion
1615 Blanding Street
Columbia, South Carolina 29201
Voice: 803-252-1770 ext. 25

The Hampton-Preston Mansion was one of the largest house in Columbia before the Civil War. Today, the mansion has been restored to show how it was in the periods form 1818 to 1868. It is set with many of the original family furnishings and artifacts. Enjoy a tour and learn of the history of not only the house but the family and lifestyle of the period.

During the Civil War, General Sherman used the house as his headquarters while in the area. When he was going to burn it down at the end of the war, a group of nuns that had their church burned and were sleeping in a cemetery ask Sherman to spare the house and allow them to live there. The house has been used in many ways since that time.

The Historic Columbia Foundation has done a wonderful job in the restoration of this house. You will enjoy seeing the beautiful treasures that only the elite could afford.

KAT'S VIEW

The Hampton-Preston Mansion was beautiful. There were pitchers made out of silver coins that the owners had won at horse races. They had melted them down into pitchers. In one room there was a black mourning dress on the bed. Hanging on the wall was a case, inside was a wreath made out of human hair. Why? If a loved one died and you want their memory to remain, you would cut hair off of their head before they were buried and use hair from their brush. Today it seems morbid, but back then it was common.



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