Traveling Across
Tennessee

President Andrew Johnson

Home >> Tennessee Home Page >> Tennessee Historical People and Events

Did You Know
Jokes
Puzzles
Recipes
Tributes

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
DC
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

President Andrew Johnson
101 North College Street
Greeneville, Tennessee 37743
Voice: 423-639-3711

Our seventeenth president was born in Raleigh, North Carolina on December 29, 1808. He grew up in a very poor family. He became apprenticed to a tailor, but ran away from home before finishing. He opened up his own tailor shop in Greeneville, Tennessee and married Eliza McCardle.

After entering into the world of politics, he became a member of the House of Representatives and then the Senate between the 1840’s and 50’s. During this period he advocated a homestead bill to provide farms to poor men.

During the secession, Johnson remained in the Senate after Tennessee left the union. This branded him a traitor in the eyes of most Southerners. In 1862, Andrew Johnson was appointed Military Governor of Tennessee by President Abraham Lincoln. After Johnson’s reconstruction work in the state, he was nominated for Vice President by the National Union Party (Republicans) under Abraham Lincoln. After Lincoln’s assassination, Johnson became president.

Andrew Johnson started the reconstruction on the former Confederate States. He pardoned anyone who was willing to take and oath of allegiance, but any Confederate leaders or men of wealth had to obtain Presidential pardons.

By December of 1965, most of the southern states were reconstructed, slavery was in the process of being abolished, and “Black Codes” were starting to appear to regulate the freedmen. The Radical Republicans were appalled by the black codes, and made an attempt to change Johnson’s program. Their first step was the refusal to seat any Senator or Representative who had been a member of the Confederacy.

When the Radicals started to pass bills to deal with the former slaves, Johnson vetoed the legislation. In return, the Radicals generated enough votes to pass the legislation over the veto, the first time Congress had overridden a president on an important bill. The Civil Rights Act of 1866 was passed. This act was to establish citizenship for all blacks and forbade discrimination against them. After the Civil Rights Act, the Fourteenth Amendment was passed. It stated that no state could “deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.” The Radical’s next passed several laws to restrict Andrew Johnson. After Johnson violated one of these laws, the House voted eleven articles of impeachment. Johnson was tried by the Senate in the spring of 1868 and was acquitted.

Andrew Johnson returned to Tennessee where he was reelected to the Senate in 1875. He died later that year in Carter County, Tennessee on July 31, 1875. He was buried in Andrew Johnson National Cemetery in Greeneville, Tennessee.



 

Tennessee Home Page | Tennessee Historical People and Events | Tennessee Zoos

About Us | Contact Us | Did You Know Facts | Jokes | Puzzles | Recipes | Suggest a Site | Tributes

Copyright A View of America 1998 all rights reserved any and all content on this site is protected by law. Any use without written permission is strictly prohibited.