Traveling Across
Virginia

Frontier Culture Museum English Farm

Home >> Virginia Home Page >> Virginia Historical Buildings >> Frontier Culture Museum

Did You Know
Jokes
Puzzles
Recipes
Tributes

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
DC
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

English Farm
Frontier Culture Museum
1/2 mile west of exit 222 from I-81
Staunton, Virginia 24402
Voice: 540-332-7850

The English house is the oldest structure at the museum. It came from Worcestershire in England's West Midlands. It belonged to a yeoman who was a land owning farmer. Many yeomen sent their younger sons and daughters to Virginia in the mid to late 17th century to begin new lives in the colonies. The English farm site recreates the lifestyles and culture of immigrants from rural England who came to the American colonies between 1630 and 1700.

On the English farm you can see how they raised their garden most times by using boards like those used here. In England they had a long growing season and usually harvested two crops a year from their gardens. They also grew apple trees and sometimes pear trees. They also had dairy cows and produced dairy products, especially cheese, for market.

You will notice the English house is nicer than that of the Irish and German farms.  That is because this came from a little bit wealthier class. The farmer here was a land owner and not a tenant farmer. The house is two stories with the bedrooms upstairs. On the day we visited they were making cheese. It was fun to watch how they did it.

KAT'S VIEW

There was a small basket of pretty red berries called currents. Most of the people at the farm were harvesting barley. There were two women there making cheese. There was some yellow stuff that they used for adding a yellow color to things.



Virginia Home Page | Virginia Aquariums | Virginia Beaches | Virginia Bed and Breakfast Inns | Virginia Cemeteries | Virginia Cities
Virginia Forts and Battlefields | Virginia Gardens | Virginia Historical Boats | Virginia Buildings | Virginia Historical People and Events
Virginia Hotels and Motels | Virginia Lakes Rivers and Streams | Virginia Museums | Virginia Restaurants | Virginia RV Resorts | Virginia Scenic Places
Virginia Shopping | Virginia State and National Parks | Virginia Theme Parks | Virginia Tour Companies | Virginia Vacation Rentals | Virginia Wineries | Virginia Zoos

About Us | Contact Us | Did You Know Facts | Jokes | Puzzles | Recipes | Suggest a Site | Tributes

Copyright A View of America 1998 all rights reserved any and all content on this site is protected by law. Any use without written permission is strictly prohibited.