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Wilton House

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Wilton House Museum
215 South Wilton road
Richmond, Virginia 23226
Voice: 804-282-5936

Wilton was built by William Randolph III and his wife Anne Carter Harrison between 1750 and 1753. The house is early Georgian style that was popular with the planter families during this time. The marriage of William and Anne united the three most important colonial families in Virginia. Between them they were connected to most of the prominent families in the colony. Some of the most famous kin of the Randolph side are Thomas Jefferson, Chief Justice John Marshall, Jeb Stuart, and Robert E. Lee. The home and property were owned by the Randolph family through 1859.

Ownership changed hands four times until in 1932 when the National Society of The Colonial Dames of America of the Commonwealth of Virginia were able to purchase the home and have it moved a short distance to the property it is on now. They have carefully restored the mansion to its former grandeur. All of the brass work and virtually all the original structure are intact. Over the last 60 years the Colonial Dames have assembled an impressive collection of antique furniture and decorative arts to furnish the house in authentic pieces comparable to those of the Randolphs. Touring through the house you can well imagine how the Randolph family lived. You will enjoy your visit.

KAT'S VIEW

There was a picture there called "Bird in Coma" but I thought it would be something like 'dead bird'. They had a slave list there too. They had a lot of slaves, well over 100. They had a bookshelf that was full of old books. You could tell these were wealthy people.



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