Traveling Across
Washington

Woodland Park Zoo

Home >> Washington Home Page >> Washington Zoos

Did You Know
Jokes
Puzzles
Recipes
Tributes

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
DC
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Woodland Park Zoo
5500 Phinney Avenue North
Seattle, Washington 98103
Voice: 206-684-4800

Those of us who recall the zoo as it was in decades past have precious memories of those visits, of time spent strolling and picnicking with our families. Some of those family members may be gone or grown while the zoo itself has changed profoundly. There are only a few places left along the zoo’s pathways where views remain unchanged from long ago.

The zoo has changed in many important ways besides appearance. It has grown into a center for environmental education. Standards for animal care have risen dramatically. High-tech biological techniques are used to study wildlife and combat extinction all over the world. Zoo professionals now come here from other cities and countries to see how a zoo should be managed.

In 1887, a wealthy lumber mill owner and real estate developer named Guy C. Phinney paid $10,000 for 342 acres of land along what we now call Phinney Ridge and down the slope to Green Lake. He kept 180 acres for himself and spent $40,000 constructing an elegant English-style estate, complete with formal gardens. He named it "Woodland Park." There was a conservatory, promenade, hunting lodge, the "Woodlands Hotel," and even a menagerie. The animal collection featured North American animals like black bear and deer, but there were African ostriches as well. The upper portion, where the zoo is today, was almost completely cleared of trees. A winding road led down to the lake's edge through the more forested portion of the estate. Phinney generously opened his estate to the public as long as they obeyed his conspicuously posted rules. He permitted no foul language, firearms or dogs (which would be "shot on sight," stated the rules). Living things, plants and animals alike, were protected from abuse of any kind.

Today, Woodland Park Zoo is a leading zoo in the United States.  Animals are in natural habitats, not the old small cages, to be viewed behind wire. Your visit will not only thrill but enlighten you about the animals and their preservation and the preservation of their habitats. This is an experience to be enjoyed by all generations of the family.



 

Pictures and information of were provided by the Woodland Park Zoo

Washington Home Page | Washington Aquariums | Washington Beaches | Washington Bed and Breakfasts Inns | Washington Campgrounds | Washington Cemeteries | Washington Cities
Washington City Parks | Washington Community Events | Washington Entertainment | Washington Forts and Battlefields | Washington Gardens | Washington Golf Courses
Washington Highways | Washington Historical Buildings | Washington Historical People and Events | Washington Hotels and Motels | Washington Lighthouses
Washington Lakes Rivers and Streams | Washington Lodges | Washington Mountain Ranges | Washington Museums | Washington Restaurants | Washington RV Resorts
Washington Scenic Places | Washington Shopping | Washington Ski Resorts | Washington State and National Parks | Washington Tours | Washington Wineries | Washington Zoos

About Us | Contact Us | Did You Know Facts | Jokes | Puzzles | Recipes | Suggest a Site | Tributes

Copyright A View of America 1998 all rights reserved any and all content on this site is protected by law. Any use with out written permission is strictly prohibited.