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Summers House

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West Virginia State Farm Museum
Route 1, Box 479
Point Pleasant, West Virginia 25550
Phone 304 675-5737

Historically, the Summers family was prominent in West Virginia politics. George Summers had an illustrious public career. He was elected to the Virginia Legislature in 1830 and to Congress in 1841. Family tradition states that Lincoln asked him to be his running mate when he ran for his second term as President. Because of his wife's illness, George Summers declined.

The Summers Log house, part of a farmstead along the Kanawha River near Winfield, West Virginia, is a multi-part structure with architectural evidence indicating a construction date during the first quarter of the 19th century. The physical evidence is consistent with oral history, which gives the building’s date as 1812.

The Summers House has a particular significance. It utilizes two important types of construction in the form of log and plank modules, both of which display expert workmanship. A central stair and entrance hall divides the interior of the house. One side of the house is made from logs and the other is constructed from "plank construction" (the log part of the house is to the right as you enter and the plank construction is to the left).

A vast amount of history is contained in that venerable structure known as the Summers log house located adjacent to the Morgan Museum at the east end of the West Virginia Farm Museum.

Not only is this house more than 18O years old, but it also embraces an unusual type of construction not common to the ordinary log cabin or house.

The house was moved to the Farm Museum from its original site on the farm known as Walnut Grove near Winfield in Putnam County. According to Walden Roush, who with his wife Louise, was the guiding genius in the establishment of the Farm Museum, the Summers house was moved to the Museum on November 23, 1980.

Fred Summers was reputed to be the last family member to occupy the house. It had become the property of his niece, Miss Lucy Quarrier. Through the generosity and interest of Miss Quarrier, the Summers log house was offered to the Museum.



Pictures and information were provided by West Virginia State Farm Museum

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